What item sums up your country's army?

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5RANGLIAN
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What item sums up your country's army?

Post by 5RANGLIAN » Wed Jan 24, 2007 3:02 am

On another thread, Sid said this:
sid guttridge wrote:
I think both bayonets and sidearms have a role developing military morale and ethos in the British and Americans respectively, just as uniform distinctions, medals, etc., do, but their practical uses are very limited - except, of course, those rather nice wire-cutting/saw-bladed/bottle-opening Russian ones.

Cheers,

Sid.
and I agree; as a former British soldier, when I was given a sidearm, I just couldn't see the point, but if someone had tried to take my bayonet off me, they'd have ended up wearing it. The symbol of the School of Infantry isn't anything artistic like an eagle, or lightening flashes, it's the current British Army bayonet (and they change the symbol when we change the bayonet design).

What items sum up the spirit and ethos of other modern armies? For example, what one item would a Bundeswehr soldier not want to be parted from?
All armies can be divided into two parts:
1. Infantry;
2. Support arms.

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Paulus II
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Post by Paulus II » Wed Jan 24, 2007 6:18 am

I can't speak for the modern Dutch army but back in the 1980's when I served there were three item's I really couldn't do without and I know for a fact that also applied to most of my mates at the time.
1. The 'long sleeved undergarment', closest thing to a T-shirt and very comfortable under any other uniform item.
2. The 'messtins', good for holding food, keeping stuff dry, digging and a load of other practical uses.
3. the Red Cross armband and insignia of the medical corps. Always worn with pride!
The one thing I could always do without was the bloody Uzi. I'd have changed that for extra medical kit any time.

Cheers,

Paul

BTW: All armies can be divided in two parts.
1. The Medical Corps
2. Those that can't live without them :wink:

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Post by Magnus » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:30 am

Image

:wink:

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Post by 5RANGLIAN » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:34 am

Magnus wrote:Image

:wink:
Do they issue that in the stores, or are you supposed to bring your own :D
All armies can be divided into two parts:
1. Infantry;
2. Support arms.

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Post by Paulus II » Wed Jan 24, 2007 7:39 am

Sisu is a unique Finnish concept. It stands for the philosophy that what must be done will be done, regardless of what it takes. Sisu is a special strength and persistent determination and resolve to continue and overcome in the moment of adversity…an almost magical quality, a combination of stamina, perseverance, courage, and determination held in reserve for hard times.
If this definition is correct it is a commendable quality and essential for life itself!!

pzrmeyer2

Post by pzrmeyer2 » Wed Jan 24, 2007 8:56 am

the company coffeepot, the poncho-liner, the fartsack, and that little bottle of Tabasco that comes in MREs.

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Post by phylo_roadking » Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:31 am

What items sum up the spirit and ethos of other modern armies
5RA, what TRULY defines the British Army is the wonderful ability of its equipment - ANY equipment - to disassemble for carrying.....

Bedford gearboxes, Chieftain engines, Chinook coupling gearboxes, ALL '58 pattern webbing, SA80 safeties......
"Well, my days of not taking you seriously are certainly coming to a middle." - Malcolm Reynolds

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Post by Magnus » Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:45 am

5RANGLIAN wrote: Do they issue that in the stores, or are you supposed to bring your own :D
Hahaaha...Good one 5RA! :D

I guess the ones that got it bring it and the rest uses what the military orders them to have :wink:

It's perhaps a quality that shouldn't be used carelessly but as Paul quoted, something to hold in reserve for hard times.

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Post by 5RANGLIAN » Wed Jan 24, 2007 10:51 am

phylo_roadking wrote:
What items sum up the spirit and ethos of other modern armies
5RA, what TRULY defines the British Army is the wonderful ability of its equipment - ANY equipment - to disassemble for carrying.....

Bedford gearboxes, Chieftain engines, Chinook coupling gearboxes, ALL '58 pattern webbing, SA80 safeties......
Yeah, maybe I should have included black duct tape in my list... :oops:
All armies can be divided into two parts:
1. Infantry;
2. Support arms.

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Post by phylo_roadking » Wed Jan 24, 2007 11:34 am

Sisu is a unique Finnish concept. It stands for the philosophy that what must be done will be done, regardless of what it takes. Sisu is a special strength and persistent determination and resolve to continue and overcome in the moment of adversity…an almost magical quality, a combination of stamina, perseverance, courage, and determination held in reserve for hard times.
After all, at certain times of the year - like NOW - the Finns need this just to walk out their own front door! :D :D :D
"Well, my days of not taking you seriously are certainly coming to a middle." - Malcolm Reynolds

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Alex Coles
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Post by Alex Coles » Thu Jan 25, 2007 12:45 pm

The most important thing in the british army, is a cup ...

... with tea/coffee!
Alex

(Also known as 17 SS)

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Hans
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Post by Hans » Thu Jan 25, 2007 3:12 pm

Take everything else, but not my slouch hat.

- Hans
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Post by phylo_roadking » Thu Jan 25, 2007 6:34 pm

they still draw bayonets in the field more than anyone else.
Have you ever tried using one of those little pocket canopeners on a real tin can? :D :D :D
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Post by Dragunov » Thu Jan 25, 2007 9:32 pm

SA80 safeties......
niceness. well, you're supposed to be shooting anyways, what does it matter if you kill your own countrymen? some US pilot on speed will anyways.

and that word... Sisu... Simo Häyhä, anybody?
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Post by Reb » Fri Jan 26, 2007 7:26 am

Draganov

Its not just US pilots that wack their own pals. That's a common malady. Go up in a light plane and look down very carefully - try to determine what is a car and what is a truck. Go over a forested area and try the same exercise.

Friendly fire is an extremely common thing in war. In my own experience I ducked helicopter gunships and 25 pounder fire. I found the latter very instructive historically (and somewhat scare) - the former caused unseamly activity in my uniform trousers. (those little orange panels inside our C**%t caps were invisible from the air <sigh>)

One item of kit that mattered most? My hunting knife. Non issue. I don't leave home with out it. Food is useless if you can't open the tin. but i'd fight like hell over my cap badge.

cheers
Reb

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