Nachschub versus Versorgung units

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dak4482
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Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by dak4482 » Fri Sep 28, 2018 11:01 am

Hi all,

I am in the process of using Google translate to understand the unit listings in Mueller-Hillebrand's "Das Heer". Have run across several unit descriptions that appear to translate the same but I'm sure are different meanings. Can anyone explain the difference between a Nachschub versus a Versorgung unit? I have seen Nachschubfuhrer, Nachschub.Kol, etc and then Versorgungstruppen, Versorgungsdienste,etc. The "Kriegsprache" book lists them both as meaning "supply".

Also he uses the various unit descriptions different. For example he shows a Werkstattkomp and a Pion.Komp. and a Nachr.Zug and a Krankenkw.Zuge and a Pz. Spahzug Are they both company units and platoons or is there a difference in his notation?

Any help?
Thx in advance

Dan

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John W. Howard
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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by John W. Howard » Thu Oct 04, 2018 1:41 pm

Hello Dan:
As far as I know Nachschub and Versorgungs mean the same thing. There may be a subtle difference between the two terms, but I do not know of it. Perhaps there was just a change of terminology within the Wehrmacht at some point. As to the second part of your question a Zug is a platoon and a Kompanie is a company as far as I know. Best wishes.
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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by dak4482 » Thu Oct 04, 2018 10:21 pm

John,

Thx for the reply. I was looking for the meaning of the different uses of zugs and Kom's. I do know the difference between a zug and company haha. Sorry if my request was a little confusing. I knew I'd mess that up. Anyway, thx again. I wonder why they would have changed the terminology for "supply" over time? Maybe it depended on what area they were supplying - HQ, regiments or divisions, or supply Parks etc.

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Leo Niehorster
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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by Leo Niehorster » Sun Oct 14, 2018 7:07 am

Nachschub = Supply

Versorgung = Service — includes supply, medical, veterinary, commissary, military police, post, etc. (all non-combat) units. Note, although some armies consider engineer and signal troops to be service units, the German Army considered them as combat units.
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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by dak4482 » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:02 am

Leo,

Thx for the explanation. Makes alot of sense. Any ideas on the different uses of zug and Kom's?

Dan

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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by Leo Niehorster » Sun Oct 14, 2018 9:59 am

Sorry, I don't exactly understand the question.
There were independent platoons, as well as platoons belonging to companies and larger units.
You say you know the difference between company and platoon. So where's the problem?
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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by dak4482 » Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:23 am

I was specifically looking at the period to make sure it just showed that what is before it is an abbreviation and not something different. But still wondering about zug and zuge.

Dan

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Re: Nachschub versus Versorgung units

Post by Leo Niehorster » Mon Oct 15, 2018 11:03 am

Zug = (singular) platoon
Züge = (plural) platoons [note the umlaut]

Both the singular and plural can be abbreviated as Zg.

Note that the word Zug can also mean a whole lot of other things, like a (railroad) train, or (wind) draft, draw (like in pull), traction (like towing), etc. Consult a German-English dictionary.

There were no official abbreviations for many words, and people made them up as they went along. For example for Kompanie, there was Kp. and Komp.

Sometimes confusingly, is that the Germans use the "." (dot) as an ordinal indicator, (the st, nd, rd, and th added to numbers).
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