Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Individual German officers, soldiers and award holders.

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Mark Townsend
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Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by Mark Townsend » Sat Sep 28, 2002 10:02 am

Does anyone know what awards Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg held, or have any other information on him?

charlie don't surf
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Post by charlie don't surf » Sat Sep 28, 2002 11:00 am

I know that there are books written about him and the plot on Hitler. I think he was an iron cross holder.

regards

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Shawn
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Post by Shawn » Sat Sep 28, 2002 11:27 am

Hi! Oberst Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg received the German Cross in Gold on 8 May 1943 while serving as an Oberstleutnant i.G. in the 10th Panzer Division in North Africa. He also held the EK I and II. I'm not certain of his other decorations, but I would think the Wound Badge in Gold (and maybe the "AFRIKA" cuff-title?) might be among them.

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Shawn

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Mark Townsend
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Post by Mark Townsend » Sat Sep 28, 2002 1:31 pm

Many thanks for your help!

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Post by Richard Murphy » Sat Sep 28, 2002 2:41 pm

Joachim Kramarz wrote an excellent biography titled Stauffenberg, The Life and Death of an Officer, November 15th 1907-July 20th 1944, published by Andre Deutsch in 1967(!).

I recommend searching on ww.abe.com

Regards from the Park,

Rich

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by teddy » Sat Dec 20, 2008 10:46 pm

This is taken from Wikipedia.....



Promotions

18.Aug.1927 Fahnenjunker-Gefreiter
15.Oct.1927 Fahnenjunker-Unteroffizier
01.Aug.1929 Fähnrich
01.Jan.1930 Leutnant
01.May.1933 Oberleutnant
01.Jan.1937 Rittmeister (from 01.Nov.1939 Hauptmann i.G.)
01.Jan.1941 Major i.G.
01.Jan.1943 Oberstleutnant i.G.
01.Apr.1944 Oberst i.G.
Decorations & Awards

17.Aug.1929 Sword of Honour
02.Oct.1936 Distinguished Service Badge, IVth Class
01.Apr.1938 Distinguished Service Badge, IIIrd Class
31.May.1940 Iron Cross, Ist Class
25.Oct.1941 Royal Bulgarian Order of Bravery, IVth Class
11.Dec.1942 Finnish Liberty Cross, IIIrd Class
14.Apr.1943 Wound Badge in Gold
20.Apr.1943 Italian-German Remembrance Medal
08.May.1943 German Cross in Gold

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed May 18, 2022 1:50 pm

Hello to all :D; Addendum to this old thread...

Stauffenberg - pre-war period

In 1944, what a tragic path led Claus Schenk Graf von Stauffenberg, who grew up with his brothers in Lautlingen Castle in what is now Albstadt, to that shabby sandpit in the inner courtyard of the War Ministry in Berlin, where he was shot blindfolded. Later, Stauffenberg's brother Berthold, along with many other Third Reich opposition members, lost their lives in a hideous execution shed at Berlin's Plötzensee prison.

After the assassination attempt on Adolf Hitler on July 20, 1944, the world viewed the German resistance as ambivalent at first. Only when the veil of camouflage was lifted and the legend created by the National Socialists of the "clique of ambitious conspirators" collapsed, did the image of the German resistance change. The action was not a revolt of officers, nor a reactionary coup, but a true "rebellion of conscience", an uprising of socialists and Christians, workers and intellectuals, citizens and nobles, clerics and soldiers, a cross-section of the entire people.

From 1943-1944, Oberst Graf von Stauffenberg was the tireless driving force behind the military conspiracy to overthrow Hitler's dictatorship. In his Berlin villa at Wannsee, Tristanstraße 8, he often met with the so-called "Committee of Counts"; Resistance fighters from aristocratic circles such as himself and his brother Berthold, as well as Albrecht Ritter Merz von Quirnheim, Caesar von Hofacker, and Werner von Haeften.

Loyalty, Royalty, and Humanism: Raised to be Public Officials.

Claus von Stauffenberg, born on November 15, 1907 in Stuttgart, came from a traditional aristocratic family. In May 1904, Count Alfred Stauffenberg, the most recent president of the Württemberg Ducal Chamber of Revenue, married Countess Caroline von Üxküll-Gyllenband. She was the daughter of the Oberleutnant of the Austrian K.u.K, Count Alfred von Üxküll-Gyllenband and his wife Valerie, born Countess von Hohental.

Through Countess von Hohental's mother, a family tree led directly to Gneisenau, Chief of Staff to Field Marshal Blücher. The von Stauffenberg line was born when the Counts of Zollern, like other princes, established the position of servant (Schenk) and steward (Truchsess) during the decline of the German kingdom in the 13th century to enhance their reputation.

The Stauffenbergs spontaneously retired from the service of the Counts of Zollern in the 15th century after a fratricidal war between the Counts strained their loyalty too much. Now they offered their services to the people of Württemberg. When the famous Duke Ulrich came to power, the Schenks von Stauffenbergs found themselves in a dilemma again. In the eyes of many contemporaries, Ulrich was a murderer and lawbreaker with whom the Stauffenbergs wanted nothing to do.

One branch of the family received a baronial title (Freiherrenstand) in 1698 by Emperor Leopold I, another in 1791 was made an imperial count (Reichsgrafenstand) by Emperor Leopold II. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the Stauffenberg line of barons became canons of Bamberg, Würzburg, and Augsburg, as well as members of the government of the prince-bishop of Bamberg and a prince-bishop of Bamberg, Franz Ludwig Schenk Freiherr von Stauffenberg was made hereditary Count of the Kingdom of Bavaria by Ludwig II in 1874.

As a member of the Bavarian state parliament in 1867 and 1870, his nephew Franz August campaigned for the abolition of the death penalty as "a purely human question". In the courtyard of the War Ministry and in the Plötzensee penitentiary in Berlin, it was not spoken of again 77 years later. The question of humanity was just a farce in the Third Reich. Contemporary historical events, power, revolution and war have always shaped the Stauffenberg family into the focal points of German history.

Stauffenberg's sons Claus, Alexander and Berthold spent their youth between Stuttgart, Lautlingen, Jettingen and Amerdingen. They regularly traveled to the North Sea and Berchtesgaden with their parents. Familiar places from his youth: large gardens, halls, the official residence in the Old Palace in Stuttgart, and Wilhelma Park in Cannstatt.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... m(Offline)
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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The Stauffenberg brothers in their childhood...................................
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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed May 25, 2022 7:25 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period

Until 1913 the twins Berthold and Alexander received private lessons. From autumn 1913 they attended the preparatory class at the renowned humanistic Eberhard-Ludwig-Gymnasium in Stuttgart. Here they studied diligently, in addition to the usual subjects, also Latin and later Greek.

At the same time, Claus von Stauffenberg went to a private elementary school with four other children. He was diligent and competed with his brothers in learning. Later, Claus also switched to the elite-conscious Eberhard-Ludwig-Gymnasium. In the middle of the holidays in Lautlingen, the Stauffenberg family learned by telephone on July 31, 1914 that the King of Württemberg had broken off his summer vacation in Friedrichshafen because of the imminent danger of war and had gone to Stuttgart. Of course Oberhoffeldmarschall von Stauffenberg had to return to the residence on the same day. Groups of excited men stood on the street in Lautlingen, women cried. On that day in the Eyachtal, around the Stauffenberg Castle, there was no sign of the often-described "hurrah mood" for war and fatherland.

On August 2, 1914, the Countess von Stauffenberg, children and servants also traveled by train to Stuttgart. The train was buzzing with rumors "about blown up bridges on the Danube and shot dead spies." Now the Kaiser's appeal of August 6, 1914 was announced and posted everywhere, it was unambiguous and read ominously:

To the German people!

"For 43 years since the founding of the Reich, it has been my and my ancestors' ardent endeavors to maintain peace in the world and to promote our powerful development in peace. But the opponents envy us the success of our work. All obvious and secret hostilities in East and West and from across the sea we endured, conscious of our responsibility and strength, but now they want to humiliate us.

We are required to watch with folded arms as our enemies prepare for treacherous raids. They will not tolerate that we remain resolutely loyal to our ally, who is fighting for his reputation as a great power and with whose humiliation our power and honor are also lost. So the sword must decide. In the midst of peace, the enemy invades us. So up to arms! Any hesitation, any vacillation would be a betrayal of the fatherland: it is a question of the existence or non-existence of our empire, which our fathers founded anew, of the existence or non-existence of German power and German essence.

We will defend ourselves to the last breath of man and horse. And we will stand this fight, even against a world of enemies. Germany has never been conquered when it was united. Forward with God, who will be with us as he was with the fathers."

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 01, 2022 10:12 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period

At the end of the first year of the war school in July 1915, all the hospital assistants who worked at the Old Castle in Stuttgart went on leave. Stauffenberg's mother and children made their way to the castle at Lautlingen. After the conquest of Warsaw on August 7 and Brest-Litovsk on August 18 and 25, 1915, Stauffenberg's father had the flag hung and the priest ring the bells.

In the spring of 1916, the countess noted: "There are always big attacks near Verdun, but people don't feel like it at all, they always say: 'We bled to death at Verdun.' Berthold von Stauffenberg became increasingly interested in the Imperial Navy at this time and even wrote an essay on the development of the German fleet up to the World War.

On March 10, 1917, Alfred von Hofacker, son of Stauffenberg's aunt, was killed at Verdun. The brother of the fallen Alfred von Hofacker, Caesar von Hofacker, arrived in Lautlingen from Macedonia on leave at the same time. This is where the von Stauffenberg and Hofacker families spent Easter together. Caesar von Hofacker had to promise everyone that he would give up his great passion, flying. He was too dangerous for family members.

By "highest wish of the king", Caesar von Hofacker was transferred to the replacement squadron of the 20. Uhlans Regiment and finally in June 1918 he was assigned to the German military mission in Turkey. The Stauffenberg brothers grew up in the center of state and military power, but the life, art and culture of the people also played an important role.

When the twins Alexander and Berthold were strong enough to help the Lautlingen farmers with the harvest, they went out to mow shortly after 6 in the morning. Claus took the cattle out of the barn and hooked them up. In the fresh hay, the Stauffenberg children built "fox dens, 5-10 m long underground passages with 3 exits", paths and weed beds and sowed seeds. During this time, the "war hero" Mr. von Plüskow, who was wounded five times in the First World War, came with his parents from Ludwigsburg to have tea at Castle Stauffenberg in Lautlingen.

A welcome change of pace for the Stauffenberg brothers. Plüskow had a serious foot injury and was wearing a splint. Three people were needed to carry him from the cart to the garden. "The handsome guy wanted to go back to the front line despite his five wounds." The children were also able to marvel at Plüskow's father: at 2 meters 8 cm tall, he was the tallest soldier in the army at the time. Therefore, the Emperor always took him with him on foreign trips as his aide-de-camp.

But Stauffenberg's young children also saw the other side of the war besides the glitz and glamor over and over again. His aunt Ulla, matron of the German Red Cross, arrived at Lautlinger Castle from Moscow, still shocked by the assassination of the German envoy, Count von Mirsbach-Harff, during the civil war in Russia. As sister, Aunt Ulla had traveled to prisoner-of-war camps by train and sled, including in St. Petersburg and Eastern Siberia. Conditions in the camps were shocking, as she reported in detail. No one could have imagined that 20 years later, the legacy of the First World War would bring even more misery to Europe. As early as November 1914, the Chief of the General Staff, General Erich von Falkenhayn, had told von Bethmann Hollweg, then Reich Chancellor, that the war was no longer winnable. Since then, however, German and Allied armies had sought the decision year after year in costly offensives, trench warfare, and inhumane poison gas.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 08, 2022 7:01 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period

Armistice and Revolutionary Thoughts.

The Peace of Brest-Litovsk concluded with revolutionary Russia on March 3, 1918 did not bring the relief expected by Falkenhayn's successor, General Ludendorff. The Americans, who entered the war in 1917, offset the losses of the French and English. On August 13, General Ludendorff declared to the new Chancellor Herrling that it was no longer possible "to make the enemy peace-loving by attacking". The end of the war had to be brought about through diplomatic channels.

Countess Stauffenberg found out about the German armistice request on the way from Stuttgart to Jettingen. She later noted that "after all the heroic deeds and all the bloodshed, one is suddenly faced with the most ignominious and humiliating peace that has ever been offered to a people". She went to church with her sons late in the evening. Claus burst into tears and said: "My Germany cannot perish - and even if it sinks now - it must rise again strong and great - there is still a God". Alexander too was shaken and in despair, Berthold didn't comment. Württemberg's King Wilhelm II, revered and loved by the people, had already forebodingly mentioned in 1913 that he would probably be the last ruler of his house.

But when the November Revolution of 1918 swept across the country, the King of Württemberg didn't want to sacrifice a drop of blood from his country's children. He rejected the proposal of the Adjutant General, Generalleutnant von Graevenitz, to have machine guns and troops transferred to the Stuttgart residence, the Wilhelmspalais.

According to the Württemberg king, a republic could not continue to consist of individual monarchies, and the other princes fell along with the emperor. Countess Stauffenberg remembered November 6, 1918 in Stuttgart very well. "In the morning, processions on Castle Square... In the afternoon the ministry is crowded. I go out with the children and we see the king walking his dog in the garden all alone - respectfully greeted by the audience".

People's assemblies and marches by the SPD and free trade unions were expected on November 9th, which should persuade the king to abdicate. On the same day, Württemberg's King Wilhelm II proclaimed the election of a constituent state assembly to decide on the future form of government in the state. The November Revolution of 1918 also met with a great response from Stuttgart workers and soldiers. They demonstrated in the city center with red concards and hats, put a pointed cap on the Kaiser Wilhelm monument and tucked a red flag under the arm of the statue.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 15, 2022 11:25 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period

Wild speeches and red flags

Around 11 a.m., when the ministers were with the king in the Wilhelmspalast in Stuttgart, the crowd pushed into the royal residence. The guards allowed themselves to be disarmed, personal physician Dr. Gussemann, head of cabinet Freiherr von Neurath, Oberhofmarschall Graf Stauffenberg and the servants prevented the angry crowd from reaching the king. The royal standard with the three black stag horns on a yellow background was lowered, the red flag was violently hoisted over the royal house. Revolutionary sentries drew up at the palace and the crowd slowly dispersed. Although the king did not abdicate, he did not want to continue to reside under the red flag and decided to leave Stuttgart.

The Stauffenberg family experienced November 9, 1918 at close range: at 10 a.m., the trams all over the city came to a standstill, "the crowd swayed back and forth around the Old Castle, wild speeches were held at the Kaiser Wilhelm Monument." Later, the crowd stormed the Wilhelmsbau, where the soldiers lying on standby were being disarmed.

The king's standard was seen falling. In the afternoon, Caroline Countess Stauffenberg went to see the Queen. A "little guy" from the soldiers' council let them in with a submissive bow to the queen. The king came over and said, "he wanted to, and we could finally go away, he had nothing more to do here".

And then on to Stauffenberg's mother, "You really have to say, I'm not attached to this post, but to get away like this, the whole military has left me," and tears rolled down his white beard. In the evening the king, the queen and their companions left for Bebenhausen in two cars. With the entourage Oberfeldmarschall Count Stauffenberg, the wing adjutant von Rom, the adjutant general von Graevenitz, as well as chamberlain and lady-in-waiting.

Red guards rode ahead and behind. Thanks to Stauffenberg's foresight, the move went without incident. By nine o'clock in the evening everyone was safe in Bebenhausen. The Stauffenberg children experienced all of this personally. Riots, disarmaments and the raising of the red flags. On November 30th, an era within the monarchy came to an end for the Stauffenberg family with a deep social break in their position in royal service. They had served reigning monarchs for centuries.

They themselves had been lords over subjects, farmers and servants. The royal domains, forests and other crown property such as the castles in Ludwigsburg and Stuttgart became state property. The nobility was not expropriated, but subordinated to the provisions of the Civil Code. Count Stauffenberg, acting as the king's representative, negotiated with the new Württemberg state government and agreed on the annual pension for the king and queen as well as future ownership. Wilhelm II then voluntarily relinquished his crown.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 22, 2022 8:08 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period.

Poetry and truth.

The political situation was completely uncertain. But the King, contrary to the advice of his followers, did not want to leave the country. The Queen went to Stauffenberg Castle in Lautlingen and she gave her jewels to Countess von Stauffenberg, who first hid them under her bed and then took them to Switzerland, hidden on her body. In the Stauffenberg family, political developments were discussed with positive interest on the one hand and outright rejection on the other, such as: "The new government is a jerk."

The first president of Württemberg was Wilhelm Blos, 70 years old. "First we only had Wilhelm, now we have Wilhelm Blos," it was said in the vernacular. But the November revolution also brought more: women finally got the right to vote and stand for election, workers the eight-hour day. Since then, "little people" (kleinen leute - ordinary people) can also stroll through Wilhelma and through the forest between Solitude and Bärenschlössle. Royal privileges expired. Now it was the people's turn.

The three Stauffenberg brothers again had private lessons in the "Türmle": on the castle garden wall in Lautlingen, they had breakfast and discussed together. Claus was always full of "theories". The house teacher, Elisabet Dipper, often had long conversations with him. Once said, "When I think of eternity, it always makes me sad when it's in front of you, even more so when I'm gone, because it concerns you. You just can't think of eternity."

"Claus von Stauffenberg was a special boy," the tutor kept saying. But all the Stauffenbergs had, each of them, special talents and inclinations. The brothers were also particularly drawn to the great poets of the day. The mother's statements may have influenced this. At the time she was in correspondence with Rilke, who was staying with his relative, the Munich physician Dr. Wilhelm Freiherr Schenk von Stauffenberg, who was treating him.

At school they talked about Conrad Ferdinand Meyer and Martin Heidegger. Berthold, Alexander and their friends Theodor Pfitzer and Hans-Ulrich Marchtaler organized "Faust Evenings" and read works by Hebbel and Kleist, of course Rilke's "Cornet" and performed verses by Hoffmannsthal. The poet Stefan George also entered "Stauffenberg circles" through family friendships at the time. George dealt with renewing German poetry along the lines of Pindar and Hölderlin. At the turn of the century, a circle of friends and admirers formed around George, which also included such Jewish writers as Wolfskehl, Gundolf (who later as professor gave the doctoral subject to Minister of Propaganda Goebbels) and von Hoffmannsthal. At the instigation of Goebbels, a Stefan George Prize was also donated, which, however, was only awarded once, in 1934.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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The Stauffenberg Brothers...................................................
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Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 29, 2022 8:34 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period.

Poetry and truth.

Because of their father's work, the von Stauffenberg family now lived in the ducal rent chamber at Jägerstrasse 18 near Stuttgart's main train station, which was the most modern building at the time, designed by the well-known architect Paul Bonatz. Berthold and Alexander continued to go to school in Stuttgart, Claus stayed in Lautlingen with the Üxküll Count children and received private lessons from Elsbet Miller.

Berthold read Sprengler's recently published book "Prussianism and Socialism" and prepared a presentation on Germanic and Christian creation myths during the Christmas holidays. Claus was enthusiastic about architecture and drew houses. Together with friends, the brothers played small roles in scenes from Hölderlin's "Empedocles" and Hoffmannsthal's "Death of Titian". The fourth act of Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" was also on the private repertoire of the Stauffenberg children in Lautlingen.

In 1920 the three brothers even published a handwritten and self-reproduced newspaper: "Hermes". Berthold's contribution to this compared the First World War with the Seven Years' War. Alexander provided poetry and a fragment of a fairy tale, Claus offered views on unemployment benefits that probably came from his father.

In these years until the beginning of their studies, the twins and Claus von Stauffenberg belonged to the new scouts. They hiked a lot, read Stefan George's "The Star of the Union" by the fire in front of the tent, sang Landsknecht songs, talked about the fate of the Reich and of the national community. At that time, Berthold von Stauffenberg had already met Stefan George personally.

Claus took part in everything in the older brothers' lives, played, talked, read with them and was also enthusiastic about Stefan George, the poet of German neo-romanticism. George, born in Büdesheim (Hessen) in 1868, the son of an innkeeper and winegrower, had been traveling through Europe without a fixed address since 1888. A circumstance that did not exactly delight the mother of the Stauffenberg brothers. George studied in Paris, Berlin, Munich and Vienna. His circle of acquaintances included Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rodin and Hugo von Hoffmannsthal. From the 1900s George advocated a strict lifestyle based on male friendship with a like-minded elite.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jul 06, 2022 6:14 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period.

The Treaty of Versailles - the first swastikas appear

In May 1923, Berthold and Alexander von Stauffenberg enrolled at the University of Heidelberg. Before that, they wrote in letters, as their brother Claus did later, about what they considered their duty in view of the state of the nation. Reservations about the new state did not prevent them from making service to the country and the people their purpose in life.

The alternative, farming, would not have been an option for either brother. Lautlingen owned two leased farms of about 150 hectares each. Claus von Stauffenberg later: "Such property has only the task of enabling the family to train their children for government service as servants, civil servants, or in independent professions." All three wanted to learn jobs that suited their "significant intellectual abilities," for which their mother had consciously educated them. Therefore, the Stauffenberg brothers claimed their place in prominent positions serving the German people as a matter of course.

In view of the Franco-Belgian occupation of the Ruhr area on January 11, 1923, a national protest spread throughout Germany. Colonel General von Seekt, head of the German army, which was limited to 100,000 men by the Treaty of Versailles, was politically "liberated" by the occupation and put Germany in a state of self-defense. Seekt then allowed the training of reservists in the so-called "Black Reichswehr". The inter-allied military control commissions were no longer allowed to carry out checks on German barracks. In this way, reservist training, which was illegal under international law at the time, could be shielded.

Berthold von Stauffenberg went to Schwäbisch Gmünd to join the training battalion of the 13th Infantry Regiment. Later, on the list of candidates for the higher judicial service examination, his name read "No (military) service", presumably because of the secrecy of illegal training in "black". Alexander later served in the 4th (Baden) Squadron under the command of Rittmeister Leo Freiherr Geyr von Schweppenburg. He "wasn't born to be a soldier", but he thought cavalry was wonderful. After that, Berthold von Stauffenberg enrolled in Jena to study law and philology. His brother Alexander went to Tübingen for the winter semester and studied law and economics.

In January 1923, the occupation of the Ruhr, the "training of black reservists", the communist uprisings in Saxony and Thuringia, the rumblings of the "national fighting units" in Bavaria and Hitler's putsch in Munich left their mark. in the people of all Germany. Many black, white, and red bands or swastikas appeared on the lapels of coats in Stuttgart schools. Things also stirred up at the Eberhard-Ludwig-Gymnasium, although the director, Hermann Binder, strictly kept the peace. Pupils of the Karls-Gymnasium with black-white-red bands provoked pupils with black-red-gold bands of orientation "Volks-" and "Bürger" on the streets of the capital city.

After the fall of the monarchy, Berthold was the first of the Stauffenberg brothers to hold the highest office in the state. From March 1, 1929, he was on leave from the judicial service to take up an assistantship at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Foreign Public Law and International Law. In 1931 the institute recommended him to the permanent International Court of Justice, where he began working in the office of Chancellor Ake Hammarsskjöld.

Alexander Graf Stauffenberg, on the other hand, had been a professor of ancient history since 1931 and later an associate professor at Würzburg. He was with the "Wehrstahlhelm" until 1933, then joined the 2nd Assault Unit (sturm) of the 79th SA Brigade. Due to his careless attitude towards the National Socialist regime, which he made no secret of, he had little contact with his old friends. In this situation, he too, threw himself into his scientific work.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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tigre
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Re: Colonel Claus von Stauffenberg

Post by tigre » Wed Jul 13, 2022 10:00 am

Hello to all :D; more............................

Stauffenberg - pre-war period.

Providence - Abitur (high school diploma) and officer training.

On October 21, 1925, Claus von Stauffenberg in Württemberg applied for admission to the matriculation examination as an extraordinary participant. In the registration and certificate list for the matriculation examination, Claus entered "officer" as a career goal. Claus passed the exam and his high school diplomas were above the class average. In May 1926, in a poem about his brother, Alexander paraphrased (with a remarkable touch of foreboding) how he felt the military profession suited Claus von Stauffenberg's nature and his brother's:

"insatiable urge for action so far away until you find it in your heart in the sinking".

After he subsequently joined the 17th (Bavarian) Cavalry Regiment (17. (Bayerische) Reiterregiment) in Bamberg, Claus von Stauffenberg wrote to his father that it was clear to him that the first few years would be "not very nice", after all it was "not easy for us for a longer period of time to play 'mean'" and to largely do without the spiritual. Like most of his comrades, he did not love the Weimar Republic. His love for the monarchy and his experiences at the royal court in Stuttgart from his youth were too deep.

After basic training, Claus von Stauffenberg went to the infantry school in Dresden. The commander here was Oberst (Colonel) Alexander von Falkenhausen. Stauffenberg repeatedly impressed his comrades in tactics. This also included Manfred von Brauchitsch, nephew of the later Commander-in-Chief of the Army.

When the tactics teacher, Hauptmann (Captain) Dietl, who later became a popular generalmajor in the mountain troops, who defended Narvik and was the first Wehrmacht soldier to be decorated with the oak leaves, once again demanded a situation assessment, decision and justification" in the lecture hall, and when "Stauf" then formulated it, there was silence in the hall and Dietl had nothing to add.

Stauffenberg also owed these successes to his charm, his schooling, "his literary occupation and daring brilliance". Brauchitsch, who preferred to ride his motorbike when Stauffenberg played his cello, could not imagine why a man so fond of the muses like "Stauf" would actually want to become an officer. During this period, Stauffenberg often went to Berlin to hear readings by Stefan George, who had a strong impact on recurring right-wing and National Socialist circles with his versions of a coming new Reich and his harsh rejection of Marxism and democracy.

Stauffenberg often met his brothers Berthold and Alexander here. At the end of officer training (August 1, 1929) Stauffenberg left as Oberfähnrich. As the sixth best in the war school year and as the best in the cavalry, he received the honorary saber "for outstanding achievements" after the officer's examination in Hanover. He returned to the Bamberg Regiment and was promoted to Leutnant (lieutenant) on January 1, 1930.

Sources: http://www.mahnung-gegen-rechts.de/page ... gszeit.htm (Offline)
Claus und Nina von Stauffenberg. Gunter Pirntke
http://www.vho.org/D/Staatsbriefe/Strauss9_7_8_2.html
http://www.joric.com/Conspiracy/Hoff.htm (Offline)

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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Claus in 1924...............................
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Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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