SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

German unit histories, lineages, OoBs, ToEs, commanders, fieldpost numbers, organization, etc.

Moderator: Tom Houlihan

luddy
New Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 12:56 am

SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by luddy » Wed Nov 29, 2006 3:58 am

Hi,

Does anyone have more info on this division (structure, strength, vehicles used, etc) particularly around the time of fighting troops from the BEF's 44 Division in the Foret de Nieppe on 28 May 1940?

Can't seem to find anything...

Any info would be greatly appreciated.


Regards,

Mark Edmonds

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940.

Post by tigre » Sat Dec 16, 2006 9:33 pm

Hello Mark, glad to greet you; here goes something to start....

On May 22 1940, during the evening, XXXXI Pz K ordered the SS VT Div to proceed to the Port of Calais together with the 6 Pz Div and the 8 Pz Div.

The SS force should cross the La Bassee Canal and intercept enemy forces attempting the break out of the pocket at a point of the waterway south of Cassel. Also the SS VT Div was to establish bridgeheads across the canal and push the British troops out of the Nieppe Forest.

During the march towards the La Bassee Canal the SS troops covered the right flank of the Pz Corps and headed for the town of Aire.

Later in the night, Hausser received a message from the 18 AOK HQ ordering him to stay at his current location. The division spent the night near the town of Saint Hilaire.

During the night scattered groups of french tanks and infantry units attempted to break out of the Dunkirk pocket.

On May 23 1940, by early morning hours an armoured battalion had overrun the 9./ SS "Der Fuhrer" while others tanks formation surrounded the 10. and 11. companies of the regiment. As the morning progressed the french attacked the 5. and 7. companies and pressed to an area near Blessy. During this fights a battalion Commander (Ersepmuller) was KIA.

Nevertheless the french attack lost its momentum and the SS troops seized the initiative. By the time the struggle was over the III./ SS Der Fuhrer had destroyed 13 armoured vehicles and the division as a whole had taken 500 POWs.

At that time others SS units distinguished in the fights that had broken out along the La Bassee Canal front; the SS-Untersturmfuhrer Fritz Vogt spotted a french mechanized column heading towards Mazinghem. He directed his men to shot the soft skinned vehicles at the convoy's tail and then the leading tanks. The enemy panicked and the battalion size armoured unit surrendered to a 30 men patrol.

On May 24 1940, the SS VT Div crossed the La Bassee Canal and established bridgeheads across the waterway, advancing 8 kilometers behind the enemy lines before being intercepted by British soldiers belonging to the 2d Infantry Division. But the Germans held their ground and maintained theirs bridge heads.

On May 26 1940, the division received one message ordering it to move northwest in order to attack the British troops deployed at Nieppe Forest.

More follows.

Source: SS Das Reich. The history of the of the Second SS Division 1939 - 1945. Gregory L. Matson. Chapter 4 The West.

On 24 May, regiments of the division succeeded in crossing the La Bassee Canal. The regiment on the right flank captures St. Venant while the reconnaissance detachment advances towards Allouagne. New reconnaissance is sent forward. Two reconnaissance parties had to advance in the direction of Estaries: one through Bethune. The other through St. Venant. While attempting to cross the bridge to the north of Bethune, the first party is subjected to enemy fire. One armored vehicle falls into a ditch, and motorcyclists are forced to dismount and engage the enemy.

The second reconnaissance party, after Passing St. Venant at 2:00 PM in the direction of Merville, was already nearing the latter, when suddenly enemy tanks had cut off its retreat. Only one of the two armored vehicles succeeded in breaking through to the rear. At 5:30 PM this reconnaissance party reports that it is encircled by the enemy. The 2d Company, reinforced by antitank guns, is sent to its rescue.

At the same time the British, moving through Merville in the southwestern direction, executes tank attack against the German infantry. After a somewhat critical situation, the British attack was repulsed. Also the 2d Company, moving north of the Lys Canal, runs against British tanks. Due to the fact that the elements of the divisions retired at nightfall back across the canal, the 2d Company was also compelled to retreat. The encircled reconnaissance party reported by radio that during the night it will attempt to break through.

The next morning the reconnaissance detachment was moved to Ham. A report was received from the encircled party. to the effect that it was unable to break through, but up to 9:30 AM it nevertheless continued to communicate by radio on all enemy movements in the vicinity of Merville. Then the contact ceased. This party was captured by the British.

Image

Source: Motorized Reconnaissance Detachment in Combat in Flanders. By Wim Brandt (SS AA VT CO). Militar Wochenblatt.

Regards. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

luddy
New Member
Posts: 11
Joined: Sun Nov 12, 2006 12:56 am

Post by luddy » Sun Dec 17, 2006 4:32 pm

Hi Tigre,

Thanks very much for that, you've been most helpful!

Thanks again,

Mark Edmonds :D

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940.

Post by tigre » Sat Dec 23, 2006 11:44 am

Hello Mark, a bit more.....

On May 27, the SS-VT started its attack with the SS Germania to the right and the SS Der Fuhrer to the left; the SS AA pressed forward between the Der Fuhrer's I. and III. Battalions. The densely wooded terrain enabled the British to fight effectively against this attack; also helped by the well-constructed field fortifications.

On the attack's right wing, sharpshooters from the Queen's Own Royal West Kent Regiment wreaked havoc upon the SS Germania; nevertheless the SS unit made subtantial progress and by the end of the day had advanced as far as the town of Haverskesque. Meanwhile the SS Der Fuhrer had pushed the enemy back through the Bois D'Amont reaching the Canal de Nieppe.

On May 28, due to the Nieppe Forest was now situated in a salient vulnerable to isolation and encirclement, the BEF evacuated all its force from the area.

While these SS units saw action in the Nieppe Forest, the SS Deutschland marched on Merville and on May 27, confronted a fresh line of British forces arrayed along the Lys Canal. After softening the enemy positions with artillery fire the III. Battalion launched its assault driving the British out of this area. Later in the day the two others battalions were on the other side of the waterway establishing bridgeheads for other german forces.

Source: SS Das Reich. The history of the of the Second SS Division 1939 -1945. Gregory L. Matson. Chapter 4 The West.

Its all; wishing you Merry Christmas and all the best for the coming year :beer: . God bless you. Tigre.:wink:
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Dec 20, 2008 1:50 pm

Hello to all :D; here goes something, hoping may be useful for someone...............

The Battle of Aire
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

Cavalry units traditionally carry out reconnaissance and security missions. While all these types of missions are difficult, providing flank security for a moving force is arguably the most complex. Smaller units, such as battalions or brigades, perform such missions more easily. Habitual working relationships, compact force sizes, and tolerable distances facilitate this. Conducting such operations in support of corps- or army-size movements however, begins to border on impossible. The SS V [Verfügung - Readiness] Division carried out just such an operation in support of the German thrust through the Ardennes to the English Channel in May 1940.

On 18 May 1940, seven German panzer divisions began their westward thrust through the Ardennes Forest. This caught the French and British off guard. Both armies expected an attack through Belgium, as in the First World War. They defended the Ardennes lightly, believing them to be impenetrable to armored vehicles, and moved the bulk of their forces northeast into Belgium. Using every available road and trail, German tanks penetrated the exact area the Allies felt was most secure. Achieving complete surprise, the Germans punched a hole between Arras and Peronne, and rushed towards the English Channel. Upon reaching the coast, they would isolate all British, French and Belgian forces north of the Somme River (see Map I).

General Reinhardt's XLI Corps was the unit directly on the right flank of the penetration, with no friendly units at all to the west or north. The unit with the mission of providing flank security for the corps (and thus the entire German armored thrust) was the SS V Division. The division consisted of three motorized infantry regiments ("Der Führer," "Deutschland," and "Germania"), a towed artillery regiment, reconnaissance battalion (armored cars and motorcycles) and antitank battalion. It also had an engineer battalion, signal battalion, antiaircraft machine gun battalion, and division support elements.

The Division Commander, Gruppenführer [Major General] Paul Hausser, returned from the corps command post at 10:30 hours and issued the following order to his subordinate units: “Secure the corps’ right flank lf the enemy attacks, turn east, attack the enemy and push him back towards the east. ”

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Feliz Navidad - Feliz Natal - Frohe Weihnachten - Joyeux Noël - Merry Christmas. :wink:

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Attachments
Map 1.gif
Map 1.gif (65.79 KiB) Viewed 5431 times
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Wed Dec 24, 2008 3:08 am

Hello to all :D; here goes a little more...............

The Battle of Aire (2º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

The division deployed in three march groups. The Regiment SS “Der Fuhrer,” the advance guard, began moving at 13:30 hours. Its lead element was Hauptsturmführer [Captain] Johannes Muhlenkamp’s 15th Motorcycle Infantry Company (kradschützen kp), equipped with motorcycles and machine guns on side cars.

Following the 15th Company were the 2d Battalion/ SS-DF, the 2d Battalion of the SS Artillery Regiment, the regimental staff, the 1st Battalion/SS-DF and the 3d Battalion/SS-DF. All subordinate units provided their own flank security. The artillery battalion’s location enabled it to provide protective fire for the entire march group with primary emphasis forward. Barring enemy contact, the march group’s final objective was the town of Aire.

The Regiment SS “Deutschland” followed immediately behind the Regiment SS “Der Fuhrer.” The Regiment SS “Germania” followed the 6th Panzer Division, to the left of the main body. The latter two regiments had an organization similar to SS “Der Fuhrer.”

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Feliz Navidad - Feliz Natal - Frohe Weihnachten - Joyeux Noël - Merry Christmas. :wink:

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Dec 27, 2008 3:46 am

Hello to all :D ; here goes something more...............

The Battle of Aire (3º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

At 1858 hours, the corps headquarters sent the following radio message to the division: “Main bodies of 6th and 8th Panzer Divisions halt in the Lys Sector. SS V Division provides flank security along the Divion- St. Hilaire line.”

General Hausser ordered the regiments to secure the entire length of the corps flank and organize for a defense towards the northeast. The Regiment SS “Der Führer” secured the Estrée Blanche-Rely-St. Hilaire area (see Map 2). The advance guard and 2d Bn/SS DF (reinforced by the 2d Company from the 1st Bn/SS DF) deployed in and around the town of Aire. The 3d Bn/SS DF(-) assumed positions along the Canal d’Aire, with some of its companies in reserve to the south. The 1st Bn/SS DF(-) and 2d Bn of the SS Artillery Regiment deployed in and around Blessy and Rely as the regimental reserve. The entire Regiment SS “Der Führer’’ organized for a defense in depth. It would bear the brunt of the impending attack.

Shortly after midnight on 23 May, isolated shots began to ring out along the Canal d’Aire. These shots became weak enemy probes against the regiment’s forward outposts by 0400 hours. The SS troopers were becoming edgy in the face of what they felt was an impending attack. Reports of enemy contact grew like a crescendo until the regimental command post heard the sounds of combat erupt from the direction of Aire. The night was pitch black, making observation completely impossible. This resulted in a lack of detailed reports by the forward outposts and even the units themselves. Something was happening out there, but the regiment’s leaders did not know its magnitude.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Feliz Año Nuevo - Happy New Year - feliz Ano Novo - gluckliches Neues Jahr - Bonne Année - Felice Anno Nuovo!!! :beer:

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Attachments
Mapa 2.gif
Mapa 2.gif (76.47 KiB) Viewed 5295 times
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:31 am

Hello to all :D; more of it...............

The Battle of Aire (4º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

Untersturmführer [Second Lieutenant] Schulze cursed as he approached the outskirts of Aire at the head of his reinforced platoon. As part of the 7th Company, he was responsible for securing the Aire bridge with his platoon and attached antitank guns. The only problem was that this was surely one of the darkest nights in history. He could not even see his hand in front of his face! Making it through the congested streets of Aire without killing. or injuring one of his men would undoubtedly be one of the “leadership challenges” his commander was so fond of.

About halfway through the town, Schulze suddenly found his path blocked by a vehicle. He dismounted and discovered a serpentine armored column winding its way through the streets. Those damned tankers from the panzer division were obviously out of their assigned sector again. Schulze still had his mission to think of, so he joined the column to reach the northern edge of Aire as quickly as possible.

The advance was very sporadic. Schulze’s impatience increased each time his vehicle lurched to a stop as the column halted again. A tank blocked his way for several minutes, refusing to budge. Schulze’s patience reached its end. He jumped angrily out of his vehicle and climbed to the top of the tank. He tapped on the shut hatch with his tobacco pipe. It swung open with a loud, metallic click, and a torrent of French greeted Schulze! The hair on the back of his neck stood up, but he cleverly gave no answer. Instead, he ran back along the length of his platoon, silently ordering the men to unhitch the antitank guns. They then man-handled them into positions along the side streets. While they did so, Schulze quickly positioned his infantrymen in the houses and gardens along both sides of the road. Within the space of five minutes, his platoon was in position.

In spite of the situation, Untersturmfüihrer Schulze could not help smiling when he thought of the chaos that would erupt shortly. When he was sure all his guns had found their targets, he ordered the one he was standing beside to open fire. The others joined in a split second later. The surprise and confusion were absolute. Antitank rounds ripped through the French armor at point-blank range, causing violent, brilliant explosions along the length of the column. The French had absolutely no idea where the fire was coming from. Amidst the screams of the wounded and dying, the tankers sought refuge in the houses along both sides of the road. They rushed directly into the waiting German infantry. Once the initial confusion passed, the French defended themselves bravely and shot up all of the antitank gun prime movers. They withdrew from Aire, leaving 20 of their destroyed tanks behind. Schulze’s platoon did not suffer any casualties.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Wed Jan 07, 2009 2:39 am

Hello to all :D; a little more of it...............

The Battle of Aire (5º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

By dawn, the enemy probes had become a full-scale infantry attack with armor support. French forces had already penetrated the regiment’s security positions in the darkness and had bypassed Aire, leaving the 2d and 7th Companies isolated there. French tanks and infantry poured into Blessy, where command posts of the 2d Bn/DF and the artillery battalion were co-located, along with an artillery battery. This surprised the Germans, but they managed to defend the command posts with the help of direct fire from the artillery battery. The 2d Bn/DF command post had meanwhile alerted the rest of the battalion and issued orders for a counterattack. The counterattack occurred almost immediately, pushing the French out of Blessy.

The 3d Battalion was having a difficult time also. The entire unit stretched thinly along the Canal d’Aire, guarding three crossings in a very wide sector. The 9th Company, under Hauptsturmfuhrer [Captain] Heinz Harmel, guarded the most important crossing near Isbergues. A force of 50 French tanks and one battalion of infantry smashed through the 9th Company and pushed towards St. Hilaire in two separate columns. This heavy blow also isolated the 10th and 11th Companies in the 3d Battalion’s sector. Fortunately, Harmel’s company did not disintegrate, but established isolated pockets of resistance. More important, it sent accurate reports to the regimental command post
and apprised the commander of the situation. The l0th and 11th Companies were still combat effective. They began attacking the rear of the enemy units that had bypassed them.

The situation was now extremely critical. Two battalions of French tanks supportted by two battalions of infantry had crossed the Canal d’Aire, penetrating deep into the regimental sector. Unknown to the division, another French armor and infantry force approached Lillers from the northeast (see Map 3). The Regiment “Der Führer” was in danger of annihilation. More important, the vulnerable support elements of the XLI Corps were in danger of destruction should the French tanks penetrate the corps’ flank as well. This would temporarily halt the German advance to the English Channel and give the Allies a chance to evacuate or establish a stronger defensive line.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Attachments
Mapa 3.gif
Mapa 3.gif (113.18 KiB) Viewed 5160 times
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:31 am

Hello to all :D; a little more of it...............

The Battle of Aire (6º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

0berführer [Colonel] Georg Keppler, commander of the Regiment “Der Fuhrer,” formulated the following plan. The 1st Bn/DF(-) would deploy out of Rely and attack through Witternesse towards Aire. The elements of the 2d Bn/DF that had withdrawn would simultaneously attack out of Blessy towards Aire. Both battalions had the mission of pushing the enemy back across the Canal d’Aire in the Aire sector. The remainder of the 3d Bn/DF was to advance east through St. Hilaire, towards Lillers, to force the enemy back across the canal there (see Map 4).

The 1st Bn/DF(-) captured Witternesse by 1100 hours and pushed the enemy back to Aire. The unit also captured a sizable number of prisoners. The 2d Bn/DF(-) reached the western edge of Aire at 1200 hours. It immediately attacked the weak enemy defensive positions there. Barely one hour later, the 1st Bn/DF(-) entered Aire from the south almost unopposed. The French had shifted the bulk of their defenders to the west against the 2d Battalion. The 1st Battalion made contact with the isolated 2d and 7th Companies. These two units had begun fighting their way south when they heard the sounds of battle in western Aire. The 1st Bn/DF then secured the canal crossings at Aire, thereby sealing off one of the prongs of the French attack.

Gruppenführer [Major General] Hausser had meanwhile judged the main point of effort to be in the Regiment “Der Fuhrer’s” sector. He directed the Regiment “Germania” to send a company to St. Hilaire to assist the 3d Bn/DF halt the enemy advance. The remainder of “Germania” would remain south of the Regiment “Der Fuhrer” to provide depth to the guard operation. The Regiment “Germania” sent its most mobile unit, the 15th (Motorcycle Infantry) Company, north to St. Hilaire to link up with the 3d Bn/DF(-). The company had supporting antitank guns. At 0700 hours, the 15th Company’s lead elements entered St. Hilaire from the south, exactly the same time that a French tank unit entered the town from the east.

The two units became hopelessly intermingled and vicious fighting broke out in the town. The commander of the 15th Company reported his predicament to the Regiment “Germania’s” command post, requesting additional antitank support. The company assumed defensive positions in basements, barnyards, and side streets. It positioned antitank guns at critical avenues throughout the town. The antitank guns quickly knocked out three French tanks and several fuel trucks on the main road, creating a bottleneck for the French armored column. Observers from the 15th Company spotted a long column of tanks halted along the St. Hilaire-Lillers road and relayed this information to the regimental command post.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Attachments
Mapa 4.gif
Mapa 4.gif (54.99 KiB) Viewed 5121 times
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Wed Jan 14, 2009 4:48 pm

Hello to all :D; a little more of it...............

The Battle of Aire (7º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

At 0800 hours, the 3d Bn/DF(-), under the command of Sturmbannführer [Major] Otto Kumm, entered St. Hilaire from the west and made contact with the 15th Company ”Germania.” The only units Kumm had at his disposal were elements of his 9th and 12th Companies and a platoon from the battalion’s antitank company. This was his unit’s first encounter with tanks and the soldiers were very apprehensive.

Kumm personally led attacks against individual tanks, destroying them by placing satchel charges under their turrets or throwing grenades into their hatches. His dynamic leadership dispelled the myth among his troops that tanks were invincible. In the next hour, 13 French tanks went up in flames to his infantrymen and antitank gunners. The 3d Bn/DF(-) turned the St. Hilaire bottleneck into a road block for the French armored column.

Gruppenführer [Major General] Hausser immediately dispatched the division’s antitank battalion to the area south of the St. Hilaire-Lillers road. By noon, the entire French armored column was nothing but buming hulks.

The Germans captured a total of 500 French prisoners in St. Hilaire. The 3d Bn/DF(-) then advanced to Lillers, capturing the town at 1130 hours. The 10th and 11th Companies joined it there, having fought their way south from the Canal d’Aire. The 15th Company “Germania” remained behind in St. Hilaire and reconnoitered north to maintain contact with the enemy forces there.

By the afternoon of 23 May, the Regiment “Der Fuhrer” had sealed the first French penetration at Aire and pushed the second one back to the high ground around Isbergues. Mopping up operations began in the recaptured territory, but the battle was not over yet.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Jan 17, 2009 5:44 am

Hello to all :D; a little more of it...............

The Battle of Aire (8º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

The division reconnaissance battalion had recalled all its patrols north of the Canal d‘Aire that morning. Some had not been able to make it back Untersturmführer [Second Lieutenant] Fritz Vogt commanded just such a patrol of motorcycle infantry and armored cars. While moving south towards Mazinghem, he observed a French column crossing the main road in an easterly direction. Vogt frowned, his boyish face concealing combat experience and tactical ability far beyond his years. He estimated its strength to be that of a motorized infantry battalion. He was no longer aware of the overall situation facing his division. He knew, however, that an enemy movement this size threatened the flank of both his division and the corps it guarded. Thoroughly outmatched in terms of firepower and mass, Vogt knew he would have to rely exclusively on maneuverability and surprise.

He positioned his two antitank guns in a concealed position overlooking the column. He then assembled his motorcycle squad and two armored cars. Ordering his antitank guns to open fire on the rear of the column, he jumped onto a motorcycle and sped off. He led his small force around numerous hedges and through depressions until he had outflanked the French column. He waited less than a minute for the head of the column to appear and opened fire at point-blank range. His force adjusted its fire from the front of the column to the rear while the antitank guns he left behind did the opposite. The French column was in complete confusion. The soldiers believed that they were under attack along their entire flank.

Several minutes later, white handkerchiefs flapped in the breeze along the entire column. Vogt moved his small group in and quickly disarmed them. By the time the French realized that his force consisted of only 30 men, it was too late. The French commander shook with rage and embarrassment as it dawned upon him that Vogt had tricked him. Vogt grinned so hard he thought his jaw would break. Several weeks later, Untersturmführer Fritz Vogt received the Knight’s Cross for this daring ruse.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Wed Jan 21, 2009 5:38 am

Hello to all ; the end of it...............

The Battle of Aire (9º part).
German Flank Guard Actions During the 1940 French Campaign.
by B. H. Friesen.

Prisoner interrogations strongly indicated that another French armor force was moving west from Bethune. Reconnaissance patrols confirmed this. Hausser believed that this was the time to commit the entire Regiment “Germania.” He directed the regiment to deploy north and south of Auchy and prepare to conduct a movement to contact to the east (see Map 5).

Image

The regiment began moving at 1400 hours and met the enemy tanks at the heights of St. Hilaire. This was the last of the French armor and the force was too small to overpower a motorized regiment supported by the division’s antitank battalion. The tanks quickly lost their momentum and began to withdraw. The Regiment “Germania” pursued them, pushing the enemy back along the entire front in a great sweeping action. The antitank units destroyed many French tanks. The regiment pushed all enemy forces it did not capture or destroy back to the canal by nightfall.

The enemy tried to force penetrations into the division and corps flank in three separate areas. The SS V Division halted and repulsed him on each occasion. The Germans destroyed over 60 armored vehicles and captured close to 4,000 enemy soldiers.

Source: Armor Magazine. Jan – Feb 1994.

It's all folks. Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

Reb
Patron
Posts: 3166
Joined: Mon Jan 19, 2004 4:49 pm
Location: Atlanta, Ga

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by Reb » Fri Jan 23, 2009 7:41 pm

Thank you Raul

I've spent a lot of time on the East Front and Normandy but I'm becoming very interested in the early campaign in France so this hit the spot.

cheers
Reb

User avatar
tigre
Patron
Posts: 6062
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2005 5:42 pm
Location: Argentina

Re: SS-Verfugungs info, May 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Jan 24, 2009 5:55 am

Hello Reb :D; I'm glad this post helps you in same way. Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

Post Reply