63 Infanterie Regiment

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940

Post by tigre » Sat Sep 09, 2006 4:38 pm

Hello greetings from Argentina, more about the actions across the Somme.

On the whole, the regiment in the evening was ready to complete the breakthrough across Saisseval, Seux, and Hill 135, southeast of Fleury, on the next day. Up to that time, the Regiment was not aware that an advance on that direction would strike into the midst of the retreating enemy; neither did it know, however, that it would be necessary to overcome a strong hostile rearguard position at Saissemont; and, finally, that it would encounter a new line of defensive positions which the enemy had prepared at Fluy and Revelles.

For the night of 5-6 June, the 2d and 3d Battalions organized in considerable depth, ready to assume the defensive. The east flank of the 3d Battalion was exposed, since the regiment on the left was lagging about 2,000 meters behind. To cover that flank, the Battalion placed the company in reserve in echelon behind the left flank, in the region and northwest of Romomt Ferme.

At 12:30 AM, the enemy, deployed over a width of several hundred meters, strength unknown, launched an attack from Fourdrinoy and a line 400 meters south of Fourdrinoy, heading eastward. Caught in the concentric fire of the company on the left flank of the 2d Battalion and the Company on the right flank of the 3d Battalion, the hostile attack come to a halt about 100 meters in front of the German lines. Combat reconnaissance revealed that the opponent withdrew immediately.

Throughout the night, the hostile artillery kept firing heavy caliber shell, in sporadic barrages, into the low depression 500 meters north of Romomt Ferme. Apparently, the enemy expected artillery to be located there.

Other targets of hostile artillery included the woods 1,500 meters north of Romomt Ferme, the depression extending from the Crossroads northeastward, the woods west of Hill 99, and the Breilly-Picquigny highway. Hostile airplanes repeatedly dropped bombs in the vicinity of the bridge spanning the Somme at Breilly and at other crossings.

It was to be expected that more heavy fighting would be necessary on 6 June, in order to complete the penetration.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940

Post by tigre » Wed Sep 13, 2006 5:48 pm

Hello folks, the battle goes on.

06 Jun 1940.

The Division Commander ordered the attack to be resumed at 6:00 AM. At 3:45 AM, the Regimental Commander issued corresponding orders to his three battalions, the 13th and 14th Companies (Regimental Infantry Cannon and Antitank Companies, respectively), as well as to a battalion of light field artillery that was attached to the Regiment for support. No changes were made in the zone boundaries.

The initial objective of the 2d Battalion was designated as the ridge northwest of Saisseval, that of the 3d Battalion as the village of Saisseval. The hills of Revelles were fixed as the regimental objective of the day. Elements of the 13th and 14th Companies were to remain attached and furnish support as on the preceding day.

The regimental command post was ordered to remain near the BreilIy—Fourdrinoy road, at a point 500 meters northwest of Hill 99, until 4:30 AM. At 5:00 AM, it was moved to the region of the clump of woods 600 meters northwest of Romomt Ferme, on the boundary between the 2d and 3d Battalions. From that point, one could see the 1st Battalion, well dug in and cammouflaged, occupying a position west of the depression 500 meters north of Romomt Ferme.

Hostile heavy artillery, located in the region west of Bovelles, kept hammering this depression, evidently expecting to strike German artillery there. A battery of light field artillery, in position near Saissemont, was firing into the immediate vicinity of the regimental command post, while machine gun fire kept sweeping over that point from the direction of Fourdrinoy.

The clamor of battle could be heard coming from the direction of the right flank of the regiment on the left which, at the moment, was located near the small clump of woods east of Romomt Ferme. A hostile machine gun on the high ground just north of Romomt Ferme was plainly seen firing on the right of that regiment; action was taken against it. Romomt Ferme and its straw stacks were in flames.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Sun Sep 17, 2006 11:28 am

Hello to all. more follows.

The Regiment jumped off for the attack at 6:00 AM. as ordered. The sound of machine-gun fire could be heard in the region of Fourdrinoy, the region of Saissemont and the region about 1,500 meters northeast of Saissemont.

A message from the 2d Battalion shortly reached the regimental command post, stating that the battalion intended to take Fourdrinoy which was still occupied by strong hostile elements, in order to be able to continue the attack in the prescribed direction. The 3d Battalion reported that it was making no headway because of heavy machine-gun fire on its east flank and frontal fire coming from Saissemont; it called for artillery support on that locality.

Thereupon, the Regiment requested artillery fire to be placed on Saisseval as well as on the patches of woods and the ridge between 1,000 and 1,500 meters east of Saissemont. (It did not ask for fire on Saissemont as requested by the 3d Battalion, fearing that it might endanger the forward infantry. ) The Regiment called further for counterbattery against the hostile artillery assumed to be located in the area southeast of Saissemont and in the depressions between Bovelles and Seux.

The artillery support shortly became effective. While the regiment on the right advanced to the attack from the Bois de Neuilly, its left flank pushing on through Fourdrinoy, the regiment on the left remained facing the enemy in a fortified defensive position along a line extending from a point north of Hill 49 to St. Christ Ferme. The Commanding Officer, 63d Infantry, then decided personally to assume command of the regimental reserve and lead it forward along the boundary between the 2d and 3d Battalions, in order to push the assault. At that moment—it was around 9:20 AM—the Division Commander arrived for a personal estimate of the.situation. Among other things, the Regimental Commander informed him that the 1st Battalion of the regiment in reserve had orders to move up in the zone of the 63d Infantry and to place itself at the disposal of the Regiment.

How did the situation meanwhile develop in the zones of the 2d and 3d Battalions? As the Regimental Commander and members of his staff moved forward, they met several men carrying back wounded of the 2d Battalion. Minor elements of the 3d Battalion and parts of the attached infantry cannon and antitank guns were located in the region northwest of Saissemont, There were no signs of the whereabouts of the main bodies of the 2d and 3d Battalions. The Regimental Commander assumed that they had kept on advancing. Saissemont constituted a strongly occupied hostile base. In view of the fact that the regiment on the left was still lagging behind, it seemed more advisable to take that point and so eliminate once and for all the threat in the flank, than to continue the advance in the area west of Saissemont, where the Regiment was likely to suffer heavy casualties.

Therefore, the Regimental Commander decided to take the village, even though located within the combat zone of the adjoining regiment. This, he expected, would also clear the path for the expected division reserve which was to complete the breakthrough.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Fri Sep 22, 2006 6:46 pm

Hello folks, a bit more.

It was around noon when the attack of the 1st Battalion went under way, skillfully pinning down the enemy in front and enveloping his two flanks.

Regimental Headquarters now kept forging ahead to the south, in the direction of the letter “v” in “Saisseval,” that is, it gave way to the west in order to avoid the hostile machine-gun fire from Saissemont and the hostile artillery fire from the region of Ferrieres (one light battery, shrapnel), as well as to make contact with the 2d and 3d Battalions which were believed to be in that vicinity.

On his way, the Regimental Commander met the 5th Company and a platoon of heavy machine guns of the 12th Company. Exposed to flanking fire of hostile machine guns located at Saissemont, these elements had halted and thought it impossible to advance any farther.

The Regimental Commander forthwith designated these elements as regimental reserve, ordered them to advance and, encountering but little flanking machine-gun fire from Saissemont, led them in the direction of the letter “v” in “Saisseval,” where a small woods is located.

While proceeding along this route, the advance was halted by hostile machine-gun fire at a point about 500 meters northwest of Saisseval; the fire came from the woods in the region of the word “Saisseval,” as shown on the map. The hostile machine guns shortly withdraw from these woods when the heavy machine guns of the machine-gun platoon of the 12th Company went into action.

Around 1:00 PM, observation through binoculars showed infantry in deployed formation, some two and a half kilometers away, ascending the high ground west of Seux and moving southward. The general situation and repeated observation by several officers indicated that the riflemen were elements of the 2d Battalion. In reality they were hostile forces on the retreat, two companies strong.

Altogether there was still no information about the whereabouts of the 2d and 3d Battalions, the situation gradually became clearer. The hostile machine-gun fire from Saissemont and Saisseval as well as misorientation has caused both battalions to move too far to the west and enter the zone of the regiment on the right. In so doing, the 3r Battalion had shifted in front of the 2d Battalion, reached Point 115 ( 1,200 meters north of Briquemesnil-Floxicourt), and there joined elements of the regiment on the right. The 2d Battalion was located in the region 500 meters north of the letter “S” in ‘Saisseval.”

At 1:10 PM, orders arrived from Division directing that the attack be continued. These orders revealed that the enemy in front of the Corps was giving way to the South.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Sun Sep 24, 2006 12:05 pm

Hello to all, the story follows.

The 63d Infantry, reinforced by a battalion of the division reserve, was to take up the pursuit, continue the advance in its present zone and capture Hill 135, west of Revelles, and the village of Revelles.

By 1:30 PM, Regimental Headquarters, followed by the regimental reserve (5th Company and a platoon of heavy machine guns of the 12th Company), reached the small woods at the letter “v” in “Saisseval.”

Fortified positions which the enemy had constructed in these woods, especially machine-gun nests, strong points with short trenches running in all directions, small trenchs offering cover against air observation, mines, some of which were emplaced and others that were lying about (small mounds of dirt easily revealed their emplacements), pieces of equipment, cans half full of food—all pointed to the hastes of the retreat of the enemy. A captured document of the enemy showed that the command post of the opponent, the Commanding Officer of the French 60th Infantry, had been located in these woods.

Around that hour, officers sent out to establish communication with the 2d and 3d Battalions returned with reports on the situations of the two battalions. It became clear now that Regimental Headquarters and the reinforced 5th Company were the farthest advanced elements in the zone of the Regiment. There was no doubt now that the riflemen seen in deployed formation east of Seux were part of the retreating enemy.

Immediately, the Regimental Commander dispatched a mounted patrol of the Mounted Platoon of the Regiment in the direction of Seux for a reconnaissance. Pending further orders, the 3d Battalion was to move to the northern part of the woods northeast of Briquemesnil-Floxicourt; while the 2d Battalion was to get ready to resume the attack, its left flank advancing in the direction of Chateau Seux. Both battalions were to resume the pursuit as quickly as possible in the direction of Seux. It was likely, however, that that would take quite a while.

Meanwhile, the 1st Battalion at Saissemont, where the sound of battle’ was abating, and the approaching battalion of the division reserve might become available first for the pursuit to Seux. In that case, it seemed advisable to take up the pursuit with the newly assigued, fresh battalion and the 1st Battalion which had seen less action than the 2d and 3d Battalions. The decision on the matter had to he postponed until some later hour.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Fri Sep 29, 2006 11:38 am

Hello folks, the situation developed as follows.

Between 2:30 PM and 3:00 PM, the situation developd as follows: The 1st Battalion, having taken the village of Saissemont after bitter fighting, had become free for disposition elsewhere and was placed on the left of the frontline to take up the pursuit. Its boundary was designated to run from the west edge of the woods at the letter “v” in “Saisseval“ through Seux, to Hill 135 (west of Revelles).

The 2d Battalion, short on ammunition, was directed to replenish its ammunition supply from the regimental trains which meanwhile had been moved up to a point south of Fourdrinoy.

A hostile battery, located in the region of Seux, was firing on the woods occupied by the regimental command post and the farthest advanced elements of the 1st Battalion.

Thanks to the many trenches and strong points which the enemy had constructed in the woods, the casualties suffered by the 1st Battalion were limited to a few wounded.

While the battalions continued to forge ahead in developed and deployed formation, the artillery opened fire on Seux, Fluy and Revelles. A number of structures could be seen burning in the distance. It was established later that the artillery fire on Fluy and Revelles had been well aimed and scored direct hits on hostile trains, etc.

By.6 :00 PM, the Regimental Commander learned that the 3d Battalion, in compliance with orders, had entered the woods northeast of Briquemesnil-Floxicourt, and that Saisseval as well as the bridge south of that village were clear of the enemy. No word had arrived as yet from Seux, where a mounted patrol had been sent on reconnaissance.

At 6:25 PM, the Regiment moved out in pursuit of the enemy. The battalion of the division reserve on tbe right; the 1st Battalion on the left; and the inner flanks of the battalions heading for Chateau Seux. The 3d Battalion received orders to follow the battalion of the division reserve to the region of Chateau Seux; while the 2d Battalion was to follow the 1st Battalion to the area just north of Seux as regimental reserve.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Sun Oct 01, 2006 8:16 pm

Hello folks, greetings from Argentina, a little more.

The mission of the battalion of the division reserve was to capture Fluy and the western part of Hill 135; and that of the 1st Battalion to take the village of Revelles. In the course of the advance, the companies of the two forward battalions gradually moved nearer and nearer the Saisseval-Seux road because of numerous hedges obstructing their path. The village of Seux, itself, was found free of hostile troops.

As the Regimental Commander and his staff arrived at Seux, the head of the advancing units had already established themselves there. Around that time, a mounted messenger of the Regimental Mounted Platoon arrived with important message: “Fluy strongly occupied by the enemy.”

The two battalions now developed their attack in the section of the village of Fluy. The frontal assault making no progress, the 1st Battalion shifted more and more to the east in its attempt to gain that locality.

As shown later by captured orders of the French 13th Division, the resistance there was not a case of rear guard action, but one offered by the enemy ’in a new defensive position. The French orders, which had been issued at 4:10 PM. among others contained the following statement:

“The orders to withdraw will not be executed.
Orders have been issued to hold a line as follows:
Small woods east of Guignemicourt-Guignemicourt—Pissy—Fluy—wooded ridge west of Fluy.”

Judging by these orders, it was logical that the hostile resistance at Fluy could be overcome only with the’greatest effort. The village was not taken until after dark, since the speedy advance of the battalions through Seux and the approach of darkness had prevented the artillery.from lending support. It was too late for the infantry to go into action against the retreating enemy who was assumed to be evacuating the region south of Revelles and heading for the southwest. However, the artillery kept the route under fire.

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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IR 63 on the Somme 1940.

Post by tigre » Wed Oct 04, 2006 3:13 pm

Hello folks, at least the last part.


The 3d Battalion: gained the region of Seux while there was still daylight; the 2d Battalion pushed on to the region north of Seux; and the Regimental Commander set up his command post for thi night at the north exit of Seux. The regiment on the left, echeloned to the left and rear, made its way to the area west of Bovelles.

In the course of 6 June, a number of prisoners were rounded up. They belonged to the French 60th Infantry, against which the Regiment had fought on 5 June, and a so called reconnaissance group (the captured orders indicated that it was a motorized reconnaissance detachment), the same troops which had offered such stubborn resistance during the hostile withdrawal.

Resuming the pursuit on 6 June, the Regiment that day took Fourdrinoy, which was located in the zone of the regiment on the right, as well as Saissemont, a locality included in the zone of the regiment on the left. It forced the penetration of the hostile front west of Saissemont; continued the pursuit in the directin of Fluy; and, finally, late that evening and in the night of 6-7 June, drove back the opponent once more as he was about to establish a new foothold at Fluy. With the capture of Fluy the enemy saw his plan to organize a new defensive position foiled at the very outsef.

In the morning of 7 June, the Regiment had a clear path along which to carry on the pursuit in a southwesterly direction. .“

Source: The Breakthrough of the German 63d Infantry Across the Somme, 5-6 June 1940
[from an article in Militarwissenschaftliche Rundschau, November 1940. Translated from the German in the Translation Section, ‘The Army War College”, Washington DC,]

It's all. Cheers. Tigre.
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by Domen123 » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:11 am

And here is the map which shows operations during the battle of Tomaszow Lubelski on 23.09.1939 (from "Army Modlin 1939" by Jurga and Karbowski):

Image

Legend:

Russian forces:

Armia Radziecka = Soviet Army

German forces:

4 DLek = 4 Leichte-Division (cannot be seen in the map - in the area of Zamość)
2 DPanc = 2 Panzer-Division
8 DP = 8 Infanterie-Division
68 DP = 68 Infanterie-Division
28 DP = 28 Infanterie-Division
27 DP = 27 Infanterie-Division

Polish forces:

gen Anders = Operational Group of Cavalry under command of general Władysław Anders*
1 DPL = 1 Legionary Infantry Division
10 DP = 10 Infantry Division
29 BP = 29 Infantry Brigade
39 DP = 39 Infantry Division
41 DP = 41 Infantry Division
Maz BK = Mazowiecka Cavalry Brigade
BK płk. Zakrzewskiego = Cavalry Brigade of colonel Zakrzewski
19 BP = 19 Infantry Brigade (part of Combined Infantry Division of general Wołkowicki)
13 BP = 13 Infantry Brigade (part of Combined Infantry Division of general Wołkowicki)
Gr. płk. Ocetkiewicza = Group of colonel Ocetkiewicz (part of Combined Infantry Division of general Wołkowicki)
DP generała Wołkowickiego = Combined Infantry Division of general Wołkowicki

*Operational Group of Cavalry of general Anders consisted of:

Nowogródzka Cavalry Brigade, Kresowa Cavalry Brigade, Wołyńska Cavalry Brigade (the same which fought near Mokra on 01.09.1939), 1 light cavalry regiment under command of lieutenant colonel Albrecht.
Last edited by Domen123 on Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by tigre » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:26 am

Thanks Domen, great complement :wink:. Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by Domen123 » Wed Jun 17, 2009 4:39 am

tigre wrote:Infanterie Regiment 63 at Tomaszow 1939.

Engagement of the 3d battalion, 63d Infantry Regiment, 20 september at Tomaszow.
tigre wrote:About 08:40 AM the regimental commander informed me that negotiations for surrendered were being considered.
The decision to surrender was undertaken during the briefing of officers in locality Zielone after the last reports about the condition of ammunition and units had been received. It was around 9:00 AM of Polish time - so probably 8:00 of German time. Then general Piskor decided to stop combats and gave a free hand to all soldiers (who wanted, could continue combats or try to break through). He also ordered all officers to convey thanks to soldiers for well fulfilled duty.

Around 10:20 AM radio station of Warszawska Armoured-Motorized Brigade established contact with radio station of Artillerie-Regiment 27. near Tarnawatka and sent the message about the decision of general Piskor to stop combats and lay down arms. General Piskor signed the capitulation of the army around 15:00. Then Polish units started to gather without weapons along the road Tarnawatka - Tomaszow, as German side decided. Casualties of the army during the four-days long battle of Tomaszow were over 1,500 dead and similar number of wounded in hospitals.

Situation of Army "Cracow" on 20.09.1939 was really very bad. The army was encircled from three sides by 3,5 German Corps (VII Corps with 27. and 68. divisions, VIII Corps with 8. and 28. divisions, XXII Corps with 4 Lei.Div. and 2. Pz.Div. and elements of XVII Corps with major part of 45. Infanterie-Division). Forward forces of the army were trying to capture Tomaszow and break through towards Lemberg. Other forces of the army were repulsing enemy attacks from 3 sides. Soviet forces were quickly approaching from the east - the only direction from which the army was not being attacked.

Władysław Steblik - former staff officer of the headquarters of the Army "Cracow" - wrote about its situation on 20 IX:

"Army's situation was tragic. It resembled situation of man captured in a fishing net and beaten in stomach but despite all of that trying to breach the wall with his head." [Source: W. Steblik, "Armia Kraków 1939", p. 571]

But not all units and not all soldiers of the Army "Cracow" surrendered on 20.09.1939. Considerable part of them decided to continue combats on their own. For example remnants of 55th Infantry Division were trying to resist for the next two days until the night from 22.09.1939 to 23.09.1939 - and never officially surrendered, but commander of the division decided to dissolve it in locality Ulow. Also 6th Infantry Division broke through the enemy lines but surrendered in the forest near Werhrata - near Rawa Ruska - on 21 IX. I personally know a man whose father was serving in Army "Cracow" and after the first battle of Tomaszow with a group of other soldiers broke through the German encirclement and continued combats, finally joining the forces of general Kleeberg in October of 1939 and taking part in the battle of Kock.

Another thing is that when general Piskor decided to surrender on 20.09.1939, he did not know about general Dąb-Biernacki and forces of his Northern Front which were incoming with relief for general Piskor (because general Dąb-Biernacki knew about the situation of general Piskor) and forward units of these forces were just 35 kilometres to the north from Tomaszow - in the locality Sitaniec - when Piskor was deciding to surrender and signing capitulation. If Piskor knew about that relief, he certainly would not have decided to sign capitulation yet on 20.09.1939.

The second battle of Tomaszow (fought against forces of the Northern Front since 21 IX and with participation of strong Soviet forces cooperating with Germans since at least 23 IX) started soon after the first one came to an end.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by tigre » Wed Jun 17, 2009 1:54 pm

Thanks Domen, it's really interesting to know polish side of the hill :wink:. Cheers. Raúl M 8).
Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by tigre » Tue Oct 27, 2020 3:54 am

Hello to all :D; complements..............................................

Incidents of the Polish Campaign 1939: Engagement of the 3d battalion, 63d Infantry Regiment, 20 september at Tomaszow.

Source: MILITARWISSENSCHAFTLICHE RUNDSCHAU. Dec 1939; published in the Foreign Military Digests, jun 1940.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by tigre » Tue Nov 03, 2020 5:18 am

Hello to all :D; more..............................................

Incidents of the Polish Campaign 1939: Engagement of the 3d battalion, 63d Infantry Regiment, 20 september at Tomaszow.

Source: MILITARWISSENSCHAFTLICHE RUNDSCHAU. Dec 1939; published in the Foreign Military Digests, jun 1940.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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Re: 63 Infanterie Regiment

Post by tigre » Tue Nov 10, 2020 10:35 am

Hello to all :D; more..............................................

Incidents of the Polish Campaign 1939: Engagement of the 3d battalion, 63d Infantry Regiment, 20 september at Tomaszow.

Source: MILITARWISSENSCHAFTLICHE RUNDSCHAU. Dec 1939; published in the Foreign Military Digests, jun 1940.

Cheers. Raúl M 8).
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Sketch 3...................................................
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Serás lo que debas ser o no serás nada. General José de San Martín.

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