Making peace in 1918

German Freikorps, Reichsheer and Reichsmarine 1919-1934.

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Postby Dackel Staffel » Sat Aug 14, 2004 3:31 pm

Hi,

I've read somewhere, I don't where maybe in a scientific magazine, that the Askaris were more resistant ( I mean better immuniezd) to the tropical diseases than the british african soldiers.
Did you hear of too ?

So long.
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Postby sid guttridge » Mon Aug 16, 2004 4:17 am

Hi Dackel Staffel,

I think that is unlikely to be a significant factor as most of the British African troops used were raised in neighbouring colonies to German East Africa, which presumably had smilar climates and populations with similar immunities. However, I imagine that does hold true for British non-black African troops, which is presumably one reason why they were all withdrawn after 1916.

That said, I have experience of differential immunities within Africa. I had a mounted section of eight horses when I was in Rhodesia. In early 1980 six of the eight died of Horse Sickness, which is endemic from northern Southern Rhodesia northwards. (Can you follow that?) I was told that the reason was that the horses had been supplied by private donation from neighbouring South Africa, where Horse Sickness was not endemic and the horses had built up no immunity. Rhodesian-bred horses were apparently more resistant to Horse Sickness.

Cheers,

Sid.
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Postby Dackel Staffel » Mon Aug 16, 2004 5:31 am

sid guttridge wrote:which is endemic from northern Southern Rhodesia northwards. (Can you follow that?) .


Hi Sid,

Not at all. Did you take anything special like jamaican grass this morning for your breakfast ? :D
It is some kind of : "Less I'll pedal more quickly, more I'll move less slowly" :wink:
In french :" moins je pédalerai plus vite, plus j'avancerai moins vite"
At this speed, you can follow it !

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Postby sid guttridge » Tue Aug 17, 2004 4:54 am

Hi Dackel Staffel,

Near miss. I was born in Jamaica, but I do not use the island's favourite aid to relaxation and recreation. I don't need artificial stimulants to express myself badly. I can do that without any help.

Cheers,

Sid.
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Postby Arne » Tue Aug 17, 2004 9:29 am

The last german fighting units returned across the east-prussian border in early winter 1919, after heavy fightings with latvian and estonian troops (before that they had helped them to kick the bolshies out of the baltic states as many of you may know).
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Re: L-59

Postby Helmut Von Moltke » Mon Feb 20, 2006 4:11 am

The Chief wrote:The Zepplin L-59 took off from Jamboli, Bulgaria, and was not expected to return. The entire zepplin was meant to be salvaged by Von Lettow and his soldiers. Everything from shelters to sleeping bags to boots were to be made from the parts of the aircraft. The airship took off on Sept. 21 1917 and headed south. While over the desert, the ship had a tendency to drop nearly 2000 feet at night. Then recieved a faint message to turn back. Although where this message came from is still unknown, and it could have been for the better since Lettow-Vorbeck had already left German East, and was in Potugese East at the time. So the ship turned back and flew for a total of 95 hours, a record at the time (still?). There's a complete article about it in "The Great War in Africa" by Byron Farwell.


cool story! :wink: was the xepplein piloted by anyone?

thanks

helmut
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Re: L-59

Postby Helmut Von Moltke » Mon Feb 20, 2006 4:11 am

Helmut Von Moltke wrote:
The Chief wrote:The Zepplin L-59 took off from Jamboli, Bulgaria, and was not expected to return. The entire zepplin was meant to be salvaged by Von Lettow and his soldiers. Everything from shelters to sleeping bags to boots were to be made from the parts of the aircraft. The airship took off on Sept. 21 1917 and headed south. While over the desert, the ship had a tendency to drop nearly 2000 feet at night. Then recieved a faint message to turn back. Although where this message came from is still unknown, and it could have been for the better since Lettow-Vorbeck had already left German East, and was in Potugese East at the time. So the ship turned back and flew for a total of 95 hours, a record at the time (still?). There's a complete article about it in "The Great War in Africa" by Byron Farwell.


cool story! :wink: was the zepplein piloted by anyone?

thanks

helmut
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Postby Doktor Krollspell » Fri Feb 24, 2006 5:17 pm

Hello Helmut!

The L-59, the Afrika-Luftschiff, was commanded by Kapitänleutnant Ludwig Bockholt. The L-59 exploded on April 7, 1918 over the Strait of Otranto when it was on a bombing mission towards the Valletta Harbour on Malta. Source: "Zeppelin! - The German Airship Story" by Manfred Griehl and Joachim Dressel (1990).


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Krollspell
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